Securee Medical Inc.

Based in Tempe, Arizona, Secure Medical, Inc. (SMI) is a technology-based company that provides advanced telemedicine products and services. Secure Medical and its wholly owned subsidiaries focus on remote healthcare systems and solutions. Secure Medical also provides expedited ordering and payment-processing services for telemedicine clients.

SMI is a longstanding member of the American Telemedicine Association, the Center for Telehealth and e-Health Law, and the Better Business Bureau.

SECURE MEDICAL LAUNCHING NEW TELEMEDICINE PLATFORM OURDOCTOR!

OurDoctor physicians are available 24/7/365 and provide members with convenient, quality medical consultations via HIPAA complaint video and or audio. Our physicians can diagnose many common conditions and recommend treatment plans including non-controlled prescription medication as necessary. OurDoctor.com wants to be the service to support you when you need to talk to a Physician or visit with them through an online video session…
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PHYSICIANS NETWORK

As part of the growing trend of telemedicine, online consultations utilize the Internet to improve patient access to physician care. Rather than the patient being evaluated with a traditional physical exam by the physician a very comprehensive questionnaire evaluation process is conducted to support the patient health profile. The physician reviews the patient profile thoroughly, and is contacted by the doctor using a HIPAA compliant video and or audio application and collects all remaining relevant data based on the patient responses.

Finally, the physician decides on the best care available for the patient. Affiliated physicians may issue a prescription for medication based on an accurate and completed medical questionnaire. Patients that fail to complete an accurate questionnaire or provide improper answers will not be considered for prescription medication. All medication prescriptions are written at the sole discretion of the physician.

We are currently hiring licensed Physicians interested in providing Telemedicine services to our customers.
Click here for more info.

PHARMACYS NETWORK

Secure Medical contracts with only VIPPS certified qualified and state-licensed pharmacies to provide you with the highest level of pharmacy care. All Pharmacies are licensed in all 50 states, HIPAA compliant and will issue a Notice of Privacy Practices for the patient to sign and return and follow the HIPAA standards set forth by Health and Human Services in 2003. Each pharmacy that works with Secure Medical clientele must follow a set standard policy and procedures.

The pharmacy system software technology was originally designed in 2004 for our pharmacy network. Since the start, several advanced improvements have been updated and improved over the years to meet the growing demand for changes in processed data and to support the quick and accurate print functionality.

Only brand name FDA approved medications are dispensed from our network of Pharmacies. Depending on the State in which a prescription medication is dispensed, the applicable laws are applied and followed. Due to the volume of medications shipped by our network of contracted pharmacies, these pharmacies are able to acquire medications directly from the largest national drug wholesalers at the lowest possible prices. These prices are extended to our clientele keeping the selling price as competitive as possible.

TELEMEDICINE
VIDEO SOFTWARE

Doctor/Patient Private Video Consultation

In 2013, Secure Medical saw the need to increase patient care by giving them the opportunity to connect via HIPAA compliant video and or audio with one of the Physician’s in our network. We have developed and deployed this video feature on all our partner web sites as required by state regulations and have supported the technology to ensure fast and clear video connections.

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SECURE MEDICAL INC – Corporate Member of the American Telemedicine Association Since 2004

Since 2004, Secure Medical has been a Corporate and Presidents Circle Member of the American Telemedicine Association. A list of the current corporate members can be seen online, click here to view.

Over the years, many ATA members have created a great deal of Technology Milestones. Secure Medical has adapted and evolved while staying current to enhance our network security for our clinical and pharmacy associations as well as our consumer-based visitors. We have the highest degree of confidence that our administrative systems and platforms are amongst the most secure and confidential while providing an accommodating experience.

As a Nation, we have a lot of work ahead of us that will require the full support of the Federal and State Governments. The ATA just published a 2014 Telemedicine Policy Priorities and it has some very key objectives that we support and hope to encourage our Governments to adopt over the next few years.

THE DANGER OF BUYING MEDICATIONS THAT ARE NOT FDA APPROVED

Adrian Carter suffered from erectile dysfunction, he purchased a bottle of Virilis Pro, an “all-natural, male enhancement” supplement that claimed to treat erectile dysfunction with herbs such as Yohimbe extract, Panax Ginseng, Epimedium and Rhodiola Rosea. Unfortunately, Adrian Carter’s anticipated night of sexual bliss was spent in a hospital emergency room…
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INDUSTRY NEWS

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SECURE MEDICAL INVESTMENT IN HISTOGEN TO SUPPORT CANCER RESEARCH

Secure Medical, Inc. (SMI) has been a loyal majority investor of Histogen, Inc. since 2008 when they funded $3,625,000 towards research and development. Supporting Histogen was an easy decision for John Rao, President and owner of SMI since 2001 and Kyle Rao COO. John noticed the advanced biotechnology led by Dr. Gail Naughton, Ph.D., CEO and Chairman of the Board who founded Histogen in 2007 to develop treatments using regenerative medicine…
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STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS

Certification Program Requirements

Select clients have utilized Secure Medical’s proprietary processing capabilities and data centers since 1998. In order for a company to partner with Secure Medical, they must meet or exceed the number of strict requirements as outlined in the Secure Medical Certification Program.

Once a company is in compliance with these standards, they may obtain our services and display the “Secure Certified” seal on their websites. Clients must also pass a quarterly compliance test to maintain their certification.

The Certification Program also requires clients/websites to meet compatibility standards about Secure Medical’s secure data centers and processing procedures.

AFFILITED PARTNER

Histogen

TELEMEDICINE PROCESSING

Safe and Secure Data Centers

There are 1000’s of pseudo-pharmacutial companies that sell so called real, name brand prescription medications online. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is in a continual battle to locate and shut down these type of illegal online pharmacies. In June 2013, the FDA was able to locate and close down 1,677 illegal online pharmacies, these websites were responsible for selling counterfeit or substandard medications, or were selling drugs without appropriate safeguards.

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Virtual health visits are growing steadily among veterans as patients and providers take advantage of the more streamlined, less expensive telehealth option. Veterans, in particular, are benefitting from telehealth services.
Telehealth is a tool designed to make healthcare more efficient and convenient. Virtual visits can give veterans access to a better healthcare experience, especially those with mobility challenges or those living in remote or rural locations.
Telehealth is a service that connects providers and patients virtually via a computer, smartphone, or tablet. Veterans can have virtual online doctors’ visits, saving time, paperwork, and money for everyone involved.


Veterans new to telehealth can request a consult with their provider or for an a faster telehealth experience to help walk them through the process and answer any questions that come up.
Virtual health visits are similar to how other video calls work, such as a video call with family, but there are some differences.


While virtual visits are becoming more common, it is not likely that a patient’s care would end up being 100% online. Most health providers will want to see veterans in person on a fairly regular basis. This gives providers the ability to oversee the patient’s progress over time and keep tabs on any new symptoms.


Usually, with each case, Veteran Affairs will require routine imaging and lab work, reviewed during the virtual visit. Additionally, a veteran experiencing new symptoms, other additional medical problems, or who is concerned with relapse issues should probably be seen in person.


While some veterans are uncomfortable with virtual visits and prefer to be seen in person by a physician, they still recommend asking about the possibilities of virtual healthcare. This way, they can create a long-term healthcare strategy that will work best for their abilities and needs.


Veterans Can visit Ourdoctor.com to schedule a telehealth visit today!

Telehealth is a term that refers to using technology to provide medical care at a distance. It includes directly connecting with patients for audiovisual communication, remote patient monitoring of physiologic and other parameters in their homes or between healthcare facilities.

Telehealth and COVID-19

Telehealth has benefitted society and pediatricians during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, healthcare providers are now advocating to create policies that address children’s unique needs after this extreme event has subsided.

Many telemedicine barriers were lifted temporarily due to the crisis. Still, there must be a long-term solution for payment restrictions so that health care can continue seamlessly in future models of pediatrics without interruption or decline in quality.

AAP Policy on Telehealth

The American Academy of Pediatrics published a policy statement on how telehealth can be used to increase patient access. It also advocates for equitable telehealth access and adequate payment coverage. One identified goal is that all children should access quality health care regardless of geographic location or socioeconomic status.

Another focus is making sure young patients are not excluded from benefits because they happen to live far away from their provider’s office. This would ensure equity with rural populations who benefit more than anyone else through telemedical support networks such as broadband internet connections on school buses.

Telehealth technologies may provide high-quality care to patients in rural areas. However, these technology improvements mustn’t widen health disparities resulting from the digital divide.

Physicians must ensure health care delivery meets quality standards and maintain pediatricians’ status as key stakeholders in the process. According to policy, there will be opportunities to determine evidence-based best practices for children during this new era of healthcare.

Further, it is vital to provide a coordinated and personalized approach for pediatric care. Kids deserve access to continuous, integrated health care that includes both in-person and virtual options as appropriate. The medical home model will likely evolve with technology, but the core component of avoiding fragmented and episodic treatment remains intact.

Takeaway

According to a new policy statement, pediatric health care providers should be compensated for the time and effort they put into virtual visits. While there are costs associated with implementing telehealth technologies, digital healthcare can benefit clinicians and patients by providing more flexibility during doctor’s appointments; it might also help reduce phone expenses from traveling long distances to visit doctors in person.

The Coronavirus pandemic has led to a massive boom in Telehealth. And it is not going away anytime soon. As it turns out, virtual health care is convenient and both time and cost-effective, especially for employers.


According to the Lively 2019 Wellness and Wealth report, 69% of businesses with 50 or more employees offered telemedical benefits in 2019. During this time before COVID, about 11% of consumers were using Telehealth.


All of this changed when COVID hit. By the end of March 2020, telehealth visits increased by 154% compared to the year prior. These number declined a bit during the following months, but demand for telemedicine services have remained much higher than before the pandemic.


The result of the increase in Telehealth has critical implications for employers. Telemedicine attracts patients seeking care for acute, low-intensity, and many times self-limited issues. In interviews of benefits executives conducted by the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI), several participants noted that telemedicine could lower their firm’s total health care costs.


Virtual visits often have a lower co-pay than in-person appointments, which means telemedicine saves both time and money. Telemedicine patients are usually older and female, according to EBRI research. Most telemedicine users had an average of less than three virtual doctor visits, showing that people often use telemedicine for acute needs or chronic conditions. The research also indicates that patients preferred to use telemedicine for respiratory or mental health issues.


It might seem easy to brush off telemedicine as an emergency measure that will end when the pandemic does. But new research shows that it is predicted that the telehealth market is expected to reach $185 billion by 2026.
Telemedicine is simple, easy, time-saving, and cost practical, meaning it is here to stay and will grow in popularity with patients and providers.

Telemedicine offers a critical lifeline for those at risk of getting COVID infections and invalidates transportation as a restriction to medical treatment in rural or remote areas. However, it also presents problems related to patients’ access, quality, and equality while utilizing telemedicine, particularly for elderly patients.
In some cases, doctors will be able to come to the home of a relative or caretaker, but if they can’t, then telephone-based telemedicine may be the option.


In reviewing over 20,000 elderly patients, there was no significant difference in usage by age or gender, although the use differed by race. When it came to patients’ ethnicity, black patients would like to use telemedicine to obtain primary care, while Hispanic patients would not. A study found patients who had a telemedicine consultation had a reduced chance of hospitalization for illnesses.


However, the incidence of hospitalization among black patients who used telemedicine was more than for white patients. In the 85 and older age group, patients who used telemedicine were likewise at greater risk of hospitalization when compared to individuals ages 65 to 74.


The telehealth service must provide access to and training for telemedicine platforms for it to be successful. That may be a barrier for elderly individuals and those with limited internet access.
A third of all visits to physicians’ offices are for older individuals, who typically have a range of additional conditions and impairments.


The research estimated that 13 million people age 60 and over struggle to obtain telemedicine services. With about 6.3 million people 65 and older who have poor or no previous experience with technology and with age-related visual impairment, telephone calls may enhance access to technology for them. However, phone visits are unsatisfactory for accessing treatment that requires visual evaluation.


The community must find a way to overcome the digital gap. Beginning in early 2020, Medicare Services was paying for video and in-person visits at the same rates. That should make all treatments affordable and accessible. Health care providers and communications companies should provide insurance plans that cover the use of telecommunication equipment, particularly as universal telemedicine becomes more prevalent.

The dangers of chronic hypertension can’t be taken lightly, especially with the life-threatening outcome associated with the condition. Continuous care is vital for hypertensive people due to critical health problems like heart attack, stroke, and heart disease. Whether you already have hypertension or suspect you might be at risk, it is entirely manageable through approved medical provisions.

Telehealth is one such provision that is changing healthcare. It allows the exchange of medical data between medical care providers and patients remotely. Through telehealth, you can manage your high blood pressure without leaving your home. This is possible through online appointments using phone calls and videoconferencing.

However, it’s vital to understand that you will need to visit a healthcare center in person in certain conditions. Also, verify with your medical care provider what features of your hypertension are manageable through telehealth.

Managing Hypertension through Telehealth

A medical professional will help you understand how best to treat, diagnose, and monitor hypertension through telehealth and when to visit them in person. But here are some areas where telehealth is applicable.

Health history assessment Telehealth helps your medical provider review your history before an in-person appointment and analyze test results or previous hypertension readings.

  • Difficulties in Traveling for In-person appointments

If you are elderly, have a busy work schedule, or lack reliable transportation, telehealth is the best option for managing high blood pressure.

  • Inquiries and consultations about prescriptions

You can quickly ask for guidance on medication refills or authorization for new prescriptions near you through telehealth.

  • Monitoring blood pressure at home

Telehealth makes it easy for your provider to monitor blood pressure results through an online appointment. This way, your doctor can track your hypertension with ease through self-measured blood pressure (SMBP).

However, please note that if you exhibit signs of a stroke or heart attack, contact your doctor and seek in-person treatment immediately. Also, if you have adverse reactions from prescribed medications or other sudden health changes such as headaches or dizziness, get in-person treatment right away.

Importance of Telehealth

Telehealth helps in regular monitoring of hypertension at home and relaying results quickly to your provider. It also helps avoid white coat hypertension associated with stress, anxiety, or discomfort in medical surroundings. Taking readings in comfortable surroundings increases accuracy. Telehealth is also cost-effective and offers easy access to healthcare, and it’s safe, mainly due to COVID-19 risks compared to in-person visits.

On the other hand, make sure you have a reliable internet connection, appropriate devices, and health insurance for ease of access. Also, as you prepare for an appointment, write down any questions beforehand, contact your insurance provider, and make sure your setup is ready.

The telehealth industry is many years old and has experienced tremendous growth over the last decade. Telehealth became even more vital after the COVID-19 pandemic forced brick-and-mortar clinics and health centers to close in the wake of lockdowns and a fast-spreading virus. Since the first waves of attack, doctors and healthcare facilities needed ways to invest in telehealth.

Key Stats about Telehealth

The American Medical Association reported a 53% increase in telemedicine insurance claims between 2016 and 2017. A recent study by McKinsey & Company also published that up to $250 billion of the money spent in healthcare in the USA can be virtualized. What’s more, hospitals are increasingly using video and remote technologies to conduct doctor-patient visits, and the future of telehealth seems guaranteed.

What It Means For Entrepreneurs

If all the indications and projections are accurate, entrepreneurs have an excellent chance of taking part in the medical industry in various ways. One immediate way entrepreneurs can overhaul the telehealth industry is through digital solutions. Telemedicine is driven by the digital transformation of the traditional hospital model. Entrepreneurs can bring efficiency, reliability, organization, convenience, and security to the medicine industry by providing software and hardware.

The impacts of technology are already being felt as entrepreneurs identify new healthcare faucets. The market already has heart rate monitoring watches, apps, and healthcare products, such as research kits, health kits, and care kits. However, there’s still massive potential for introducing new products and applications. Telehealth relies on efficient communication, flexibility, and a wide range of digital products. With increasing customer acceptance, the market is poised for tremendous growth and demand for solutions.

Navigating the Post-Pandemic Industry

Entrepreneurs have opportunities coming from all directions. Many healthcare practices involve face-to-face appointments, and virtualization will require different solutions. Many hospitals have already adopted telehealth, and practitioners are taking compensation for virtual consultations, so the industry is due for an overhaul. For entrepreneurs, the challenge is to identify what’s on-demand, analyze emerging opportunities and forecast the future of telehealth.

Telemedicine (TM) recently became necessary when the COVID-19 pandemic forced the closure of most brick-and-mortar operations. Since the first wave, remote communications have become the substitute for face-to-face visits, with TM vital in modern healthcare delivery. Here’s an overview of the future of telehealth for hematology and oncology care.

Telemedicine Virtual Visit Compensation

Lack of proper compensation has been the leading barrier to the widespread implementation of telemedicine. However, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) mandated financial parity of virtual and face-to-face visits, an excellent incentive for oncologists and hematologists to invest in telehealth services for their patients. With the barrier gone, Telemedicine is set to become the mainstream option for doctor-patient visits.

Demand for Hematology-Oncology Services

The number of diagnosed cancer cases has been increasing but so has the number of cancer survivors. ASCO projects a 40% increase in demand for cancer care services by 2026. Unfortunately, statistics indicate fewer oncologists each year, meaning the increased demand is poised to coincide with a shortage. As ASCO projects, there’ll be a shortage of at least 2,200 oncologists by 2026.

TM offers a feasible solution for optimizing oncology care, as it eliminates the need for face-to-face visits. Doctors can schedule more flexible and manageable appointments remotely via phone calls and internet technologies like web conferencing. As it stands, the increased demand for cancer care and shortage of practitioners will work in favor of telemedicine.

A Virtual Future for Oncologists/Hematologists

Oncology and hematology centers are located close to state lines, which has been great for the implementation of telehealth. TM video and telephone visits are already taking place in many areas, and its future in oncology and hematology care is almost inevitable, given the growing focus on convenience.

Telemedicine saves patients the burden of commuting to brick-and-mortar offices and centers. It also makes it easier to receive alternative opinions without leaving home. All current developments point to future hematology and oncology care heavily reliant on telemedicine. However, some oncologists say it’s still too early to project the role of telehealth.

Some would say it’s long overdue, but finally, it has come to pass. On June 24, 2021, Phil Murphy, the Governor of New Jersey, signed into law legislation that allows healthcare workers to authorize the use of marijuana for medical use via telehealth/telemedicine.


A press release indicated that Sen. O’Scanlon Declan and state assemblywomen Joann Downey and Pamela Lampitt sponsored the bill.


This new law allows licensed healthcare providers to authorize medical marijuana on qualified patients through telehealth or telemedicine. However, it is a requirement that telemedicine/telehealth must abide by the standard care required by in-person treatment and assessment.


After a patient is authorized to use medical marijuana, the healthcare provider can decide whether to continue the authorization via telehealth/telemedicine or invite the patient for a face-to-face (in-person) consultation.
According to medical experts, most marijuana patients have mobility problems that make it impossible for them to visit doctors’ offices as frequently as is desired. For this reason, they are left with no option but to rely on telemedicine/telehealth.


The medical experts emphasize that the anxiety reduction, nausea prevention, muscle relaxation, and pain-relief properties of medical marijuana can’t be ignored because they are necessary for patients suffering from acute or severe medical conditions.


Since the coronavirus pandemic outbreak, insurers and the federal government have supported virtual visits and have endorsed them for many therapies, including medical marijuana. That explains why over 24 states have temporarily permitted the prescription of medical marijuana via telemedicine. This has boosted the number of patients seeking medical assistance but cannot attend physical sessions. Many health workers and patients are now calling upon the authorities to make this model permanent.


According to two medical experts, Downey and Lampitt, this new law is so much welcome because it will leverage technology to make it easy for people to access medical treatment at reduced costs.


Digital authorization is the best way to enable doctors to provide cannabis patients with medication because most of these patients are certified homebound or developmentally disabled.


Some states considering expanding or enacting medical marijuana access include Alabama, Nebraska, Kansas, South Carolina, Tennessee, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Georgia, Utah, and Virginia.

Over the years, telemedicine is expanding in the USA and has a positive impact on HIV care. It results in reduced transmission rates and increased patient/provider satisfaction.


In retrospective research, the Open Forum Infectious Diseases found telemedicine visits to be equally beneficial as in-person visits for suppressing and managing viral load in individuals with HIV.


Researchers looked at the records of both groups of patients between May 2017 and April 2018. They found that a telemedicine group fared better than an in-person care group.


Telemedicine consultations can have many benefits. You don’t need to travel in person for these visits, which means you can save time and effort on your commute. There’s also the added benefit of having something like streaming video to keep you updated throughout consultations.


There are many other factors to consider when deciding on a location’s suitability for HIV patients. The study’s findings were that HIV patients who are rural-based have worse prognoses than those who reside in an urban area.
A study published in the American Journal of Family Medicine found that telemedicine for HIV patients in rural Georgia yielded comparable results as in-person care.


To reach their goals for the study, the researchers tested a treatment called anti-viral treatment on everyone in the study group. The objective was to make sure that there was no negative correlation between the efficacy of this treatment and the age, race, and gender characteristics of participants.


82% of patients in the telemedicine group and 50% in the in-person group had a CD4 count greater than or equal to 643 cells/mm3. The results were all statistically significant.


The study compared treatment outcomes for patients in two groups-those who received traditional face-to-face therapy and those who used a video conferencing platform. Although the group that used computer-based methods showed reduced improvement at first, this difference disappeared over time.


The research offers hope that telemedicine could seem like the solution for those rural areas with the highest level of access to care issues.


Telemedicine is a helpful resource for the long-term management of chronic diseases such as HIV in locations without local physicians.

The covid-19 pandemic has had an impact on every aspect of human life. Due to the travel and interaction challenges posed by the pandemic, telehealth has become more of a necessity than an option. However, with the vaccine outcomes, there is a possibility of humans bidding goodbye to the illness. The question now is how the future looks like for this critical service post the pandemic.

The American Medical Association seems confident that telehealth will remain a critical part of health services even after the pandemic eases. During the pandemic, 50% of healthcare providers offered telehealth services. Even after the pandemic, these institutions will still consider virtual health care alternatives for their patients. Nonetheless, the choice of service will depend on the ailment and the patient’s condition.

Advantages of Telehealth

Telehealth services have no limitations of space. Traditional medical care practice requires a lot of room for patients, doctors, members of staff, and equipment.

It also happens that patients and healthcare practitioners must be at the same place at the same time. This is, however, different from telehealth as it breaks barriers of geographical locations.

In most parts of the country, health care institutions enjoy the benefits of telehealth as it reduces overcrowding in hospitals. Space in health facilities has been a critical factor during the pandemic. A hybrid model made up of both in-person and telemedicine works perfectly when put when adequately strategized.

Remote Care Technology provides Patients with healthcare alternatives. The healthcare arena has shifted with advancements in technology. Healthcare providers have tight schedules with patients located in different parts of the country. However, the pandemic has opened up and pushed for the adoption of new technologies that were overlooked in the past. The same changes apply to the modes of payment, policies, and procedures.

With the expansion of telehealth, healthcare systems can now work with limited budgets while attending to a broader clientele. They are, therefore, able to offer even more affordable consultation services to their patients comfortably. Additionally, the services provided by telehealth are of the same quality as those of in-person.
Challenges

Compliance with the policies and procedures is a significant factor in the provision of virtual healthcare services. More patient data is collected and stored by health care providers. There is also a need for proper management and oversight.

Fortunately, the United States Department of Health and Human Services suspended imposition of penalties to institutions that didn’t comply with HIPAA Rules during the Covid-19 pandemic. However, this suspension will not last long. With the return of normalcy, these regulations are going to take full effect.
Post-pandemic expected changes

Experts predict telehealth services will advance, taking a new shift post-pandemic with much better hybrid services and platforms. One positive impact of the crisis on healthcare systems was that it broke down barriers through technology and opened new opportunities.