Hereditary diseases are disorders that run in the family, and most are not cured. They are passed from parents to a child through defective genes. The transmission happens through chromosomes. One such condition is Cystic fibrosis (CF).

Cystic fibrosis affects the digestive system and the lungs producing a thick mucus that clogs the lungs and obstructs the pancreas. This life-threatening disorder is a significant concern for many, especially with the current COVID-19 pandemic. CF patients are at more risk because of coronavirus complications, and extra care is needed to manage the condition.

Such delicate situations require you to stay at home to avoid unnecessary exposure. Currently, telehealth is a reliable way for CF management. Telehealth integrates digital technology in healthcare communication through mobile apps, text messages, videoconferencing, and emails.

In the wake of the global pandemic, telehealth has proven to be effective in managing CF patients. It provides a safe environment for the medical team and patients to receive and offer healthcare.

Telehealth Importance

Telehealth is essential and convenient when utilized to :

  • Inquire about prescription refills and medication schedule
  • Taking a virtual exercise routine
  • Reporting new but non-urgent symptoms
  • Bringing to therapists, doctors, and others

However, for medical exams requiring lab samples, this technology is not reliable. Also, remember to call the emergency room immediately whenever you experience sudden severe symptoms such as increased drowsiness, severe breathing difficulties, non-stop wheezing and coughing, the appearance of blue lips or fingers, and blood streaks in mucus.

Advantages of Telehealth in CF

Telehealth offers medical options that reduce safety concerns like social distance associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. It also reduces the burden linked to CF care which is time-consuming and intense.

This technology allows doctors to attend to patients remotely where a physical visit is difficult or risky.

Telehealth challenges

Some of the most common challenges include unstable connectivity due to reliance on digital signals, insurance coverage options available for you, differing adherence levels in patients, and others.

However, telehealth remains reliable in CF management during the pandemic.

While telehealth has always existed, this is much like saying that Zoom always existed. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, providers have ramped up the availability of telehealth to an extent far more significant than before. For that matter, many people have gotten their first experience with receiving medical care from home. While some may feel skeptical about it, people should be excited. If you have a chronic pain condition such as arthritis, telehealth can significantly benefit your health and wellness.

What is Telehealth?

Telehealth is a set of medical services that revolve around phone calls and other forms of remote communication, such as video calls. While telehealth cannot replace the traditional doctor’s visit for those with arthritis, it has a great deal to offer people with arthritis.

Benefits of Telehealth for Arthritis

There are many occasions where telehealth can be helpful for people who have arthritis. Some of the situations where it’s a good choice include, but are not limited to;

  • You’re experiencing a severe episode of pain that makes travel difficult
  • A quick checkup before deciding whether or not to visit the doctor in person, saving time and money
  • Followup check-ins to assess how you’re doing in the days or weeks following an appointment
  • Keeping in close contact with your doctor when frequent visits aren’t practical

But even more than these benefits, the original reason for the rise of telehealth may be the most important right now. When people can receive medical care from the comfort and safety of the home, it reduces the risks of virus exposure to the doctor, patient, and other patients.

While telehealth may seem like something strange to adapt to, it has the potential to help reduce the spread of COVID while improving the quality of life for those with chronic pain.

The pandemic has introduced a majority of the public to remote versions of their everyday tasks. School is online, work is done in the home office, and doctor’s appointments are phone calls or video meetings. If you’re one of the thousands of people that have embraced this new remote life, you may have trouble sustaining it with your doctor.

Loss of Accommodations

Telehealth was once just an idea with few groups fitting into the category of “Telehealth is better than in-person appointments for this patient.” As such, telehealth visits saw lower reimbursement amounts from claims. This was changed when the pandemic started, and telehealth received the same treatment as physical visits regarding coverage.

Another pain point for patients and doctors alike is privacy concerns. This isn’t unique to the medical field; financial institutions and research facilities have all had to adjust the strictness of data collection. Telehealth is only as secure as the connection between each screen and the environment you’re in during the session. 

Where Telehealth May Remain the Standard

 you may be wondering if it will still be available even at a slightly higher cost. The answer is a resounding “most likely.” Many mental health patients have found telehealth is better for visits as it can reduce anxiety being in a comfortable space.

Consultations are another area that fits well into telehealth. The non-physical symptom can be described to the doctor, and with some probing questions, an initial idea of the problem can be formed. This lets the doctor determine if an in-person appointment is necessary for the examination. If not, a prescription can be filled, or you may have a quick stop at a clinic for testing instead of a complete doctor visit.

In any case, telehealth isn’t going anywhere, As time goes on, telehealth visits will continue to improve and virtual health visits will be the norm. 

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive brain disorder requiring continuous therapy. Dead brain nerve cells cause a drop in dopamine production, leading to PD. This neurotransmitter regulates movement and attention in the body.

Clinicians rely on medication, occupational, and physical therapy in PD management. However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it became difficult to provide healthcare to patients without exposure to the virus. Thanks to the telehealth services, PD is now manageable with minimal risk of the pandemic.

Neurologists and other specialists can safely schedule regular check-ups, examine any new symptoms, and review medication side effects, refills, and other complications.

Advantages of Telehealth

Telehealth has helped clinicians for many years to reach and care for more patients reducing the rate of deterioration.

Here are some expected benefits of telemedicine:

Safety

PD impairs mobility making it difficult for patients to drive or even walk. With telehealth, caregivers can provide homebound services. This eliminates the need for constant physical movement and related risks for patients.

Satisfaction

Many PD patients have shown high satisfaction levels with telemedicine. In turn, it improves trust in medical guidance.

Comfort

The reduction in regular movements helps patients receive health care from the comfort of their homes.

When considering telehealth, first contact your insurance company for coverage verification, then check if your healthcare provider has telehealth care.

Telehealth is seeing more and more use. However, it still needs to be precisely what it can and cannot be used for, as shown by the debates about allowing eye care use. Currently, around 30 states allow this to some extent. In contrast, several others have banned it. The Michigan Legislature is one of the latest to examine the issue.


For those who are curious, the Michigan Legislature is minimally examining the issue. The proposal is to let contact lens users get eye exams conducted via telehealth. However, there are precautions built into the proposal to limit potential problems. For example, people need a prescription from an eye doctor before getting any eye care via telehealth. Similarly, people need an in-person eye exam if their telehealth eye exam says their prescription has changed. Effectively, this means that the proposal is intended for just contact lens users seeking a renewal while their prescription hasn’t changed.


Both the arguments for this proposal and the arguments against this proposal are very similar to those voiced in other debates on the issue. Generally speaking, people support telehealth for eye care because they believe it will lead to better health outcomes. This is because people will have an easier time accessing such services, thus increasing people’s chances of using them regularly. Something significant because catching potential problems early makes it much easier to treat them. Furthermore, telehealth tends to lower the cost of such services, which has a similar effect.
Meanwhile, people oppose telehealth for eye care because such services aren’t as good as their in-person counterparts.

For instance, an eye exam conducted via telehealth can reveal the prescription, but it can’t examine the eye for the signs of severe eye problems that can lead to blindness or worse. There is a possibility patients may decide to go for eye exams via telehealth because of their increased convenience while skipping out on in-person eye exams to cover this other critical aspect of eye care.

The worldwide pandemic has led to the dawn of a new kind of medical care in treating common health issues. Known as telehealth, this new type of medical care is done online. Doctors and patients meet virtually through a portal to chat by video regarding symptoms.

Routine virtual health checkups have many advantages for those with high LDL levels. There are many pros, including access to educational materials designed for making better lifestyle choices. You can openly discuss options with your doctor during an online session. And the odds are excellent that you can have a handy list of all medications and supplements convenient.

Telehealth enables you to schedule an appointment in a much shorter amount of time without the hassle of commuting. You won’t need to worry about long wait times in a crowded lobby and can get service right away.

 You can check in with your physician and receive feedback on lowering your LDL level. Discussing better treatment options through video or online chat will be more detailed. The focus is more on you and your needs.

Doctors have good reason to celebrate the use of telehealth. They can look forward to the idea of offering insight into making lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, and weight loss. Plus, they can have a conversation on medication and make adjustments to it as needed.

Hearing a patient’s concern about the effectiveness of high cholesterol prescriptions is key to making tweaks in the dosage. Plus, a more thorough assessment of any recent blood work can be caused due to less time pressure.

Your doctor or clinic may have access to the latest technology in measuring your cholesterol levels. Or they may recommend certain apps that record data on your exercise levels and track your calories. Telehealth may be the most affordable checkup out there.

Telehealth works very well when done in combination with an office visit. You can discuss vitals, lab results, and other issues. You’ll have your virtual visit right at home. And with more people choosing to remain healthy in place, virtual medicine is the wave of the future.

In a recent study, Royal Phillips, a global leader in health technology, found out that more people experienced sleep challenges during the outbreak of COVID-19. A whopping 58% of the study respondents expressed a willingness to seek help for their sleep concerns from a specialist through telehealth services even though they hadn’t tried it yet.

The survey indicated that there was broader interest in seeking virtual care spurred by the virus outbreak. At least a third of the consumers had accessed telehealth appointments and with over half admitting it was their first.

Lee Chiong Teofilo spoke of the availability of tools needed to offer telehealth efficiently and the rising interest from consumers to access it. However, a significant percentage of consumers expressed that they expected it to be challenging to find a sleep specialist through a telephone-based or online program.

55% of participants of the study were content with their sleeping patterns. Only 40% of the United States respondents were a bit satisfied with their sleep patterns. At the same time, those from India reported the highest number of somewhat happy respondents with their sleep patterns. Japan had the lowest number of respondents who were content with their sleep.

In the market, sleep concerns have led to the development of tools geared towards improving sleep health. Some of these tools include behavioral therapy software and wearable trackers.

In a nutshell, when appropriately used, sleep telehealth can empower patients to make better decisions, provide equitable health care, improve the quality of care and improve health outcomes.

There is no denying the effect of COVID-19 on the world. It has changed how we do the most fundamental things, such as shopping, going to school or work, dining out, and medical appointments. One of the most significant emerging medical practices since the beginning of the pandemic has been telehealth. For some branches of medicine, this is relatively simple. Psychologists, for example, can quickly turn what would have been an office visit into a telehealth appointment via phone or computer. But for hematologists, making the switch was not without difficulties.


However, telehealth has provided the best way to avoid possible exposure to COVID-19. After adapting their practices to allow for video-based services to limit patient exposure to the pandemic, hematologists began to see improved patient satisfaction numbers. There are still some significant obstacles to providing everyone with telehealth services. One of the biggest is the lack of communication available for patients living in an area with little or no wi-fi signal. Another is the hesitancy of some patients to become involved with these appointments due to fears of HIPPA rights being violated.


So, where do hematologists go from here? Though things have improved for many patients, there is still work to be done regarding some at-risk groups, such as the elderly, those without proper insurance, and those with little income. Many patients have had their fears assuaged regarding HIPPA procedures after months of successful telehealth appointments. Telehealth is much more likely to expand following the pandemic, adding even more services for patients.


Patients have even begun embracing their telehealth appointments. They are incredibly convenient. You answer the phone or sign on to speak to your doctor instead of having to drop everything for a face-to-face visit. Your appointment will take less time than a regular visit, leaving more time to enjoy. As time passes, hematologists will likely continue to utilize telehealth technology and incorporate more tasks into non-contact visits. Telehealth holds rewards for everyone, from the physician to the patient, allowing proper treatment without face-to-face contact.

Adapting to COVID-19 has become a necessity in the wake of its long-standing and far-reaching effects. Telehealth has been widely adopted in the health sector to cope with the ‘stay at home’ restrictions. Dermatologists have had to conform to technology to treat patients from the comfort of their homes.

Some of the benefits dermatologists have experienced from using telehealth include:

  • Virtual appointments offer flexibility.

Most patients are thrilled to enjoy the benefits of a consultation from the comfort of their homes. It is easier for a dermatologist to see and analyze the medication’s usefulness and effectiveness as opposed to a regular consultation where patients are likely to forget it at home.

  • Virtual appointments promote comfort and confidence.

Patients are comfortable interacting with a dermatologist from their place of comfort.

Patients tend to open up more and better account medical history when they are comfortable. There is arguably no better place to feel more comfortable than your own home.

How are dermatologists carrying out a virtual appointment?

Setting an appointment.

A telemedicine appointment may take three forms:

  • A telephone call
  • A video conference
  • Sending information to your dermatologist with details about your medical history, records, and the like.

Preparing for a virtual appointment

The dermatologist first ensures the patient’s insurance covers telemedicine visits. Patients are advised to confirm their home internet is stable and working. Devices that may be used during the consultation, such as computers and phones, should also be functioning correctly. It is essential to write a list of all the medications you have been using and have a photo if the camera quality isn’t excellent. The image can be later emailed to the dermatologist. To collect as much information as possible, it is essential to have a journal where you record a daily account of the disease’s effects to share with your dermatologist.

Examination during the telemedicine appointment

A nurse or dermatologist will inquire about the patient’s history, symptoms, medication, and how they are feeling. The dermatologist later goes into details about these questions to assess the situation. The patient may need to show the dermatologist the affected areas. Therefore, it is essential to wear something you can quickly disrobe.

Treating the ailment

After evaluating the symptoms and seeing the affected area, the dermatologist offers a diagnosis and a viable treatment option. This may include treatment or recommendations for asymptomatic conditions that affect the patient’s quality of life and comfort.

Your skin is an essential part of your overall health. Contact a certified dermatologist today to get a handle on your well-being. Ensure your insurance covers telemedicine appointments before consulting a dermatologist.

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic and its resulting restrictions, many have changed how we navigate and receive goods and services. The health sector has been dramatically affected and influenced by the pandemic with the adoption of technological improvements that have allowed many to access healthcare from the comfort of their homes.

Below are some of the ways the pandemic has aided technological developments in the health sector:

Telehealth

It is a broad spectrum of health products and services and devices that utilize remote communication to collect and spread data related to health matters. This includes using a monitor to participate in medical seminars, collect medical data and issue prescriptions.

Telemedicine

On the other hand, telemedicine is a more direct means of communication between a medical professional and a patient through audio or video. It may involve sending data from a home medical sensor to a clinician who virtually explains what the data means and offers recommendations.

Health devices

With the stay at home’ recommendation issued, consumers needed the means to monitor some of their bodily functions, such as blood pressure and heart activity, to stay healthy. As a result, health devices were improved and developed to carry out such operations.

Some of these health devices include:

  • Smartwatches that can read blood pressure
  • Touchless digital thermometers
  • Personal EKG devices 
  • Pulse oximeter

However, when utilizing health devices, it is essential to remember that the readings differ in accuracy and repeatability with medical-grade devices. The term ‘FDA cleared’ plastered on the product implies that the FDA has gone over the manufacturer’s data backing up the product’s functionalities. It doesn’t mean they tested or looked at the outcome.

It is always advisable to take your health device to a physical clinician and compare readings with a medical-grade device to understand the discrepancies in readings and even tweak it to have better lessons.

The fantastic ability of technology to keep up with the pandemic’s effects has helped us successfully manage our health and understand our bodies better, thereby increasing the overall lifespan duration.

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